Falconry: A Living Human Heritage found at Creamer’s Field

A major component of falconry is its involvement with wildlife and environmental conservation.  One great story involves our beloved, Peregrine Falcons.  The Peregrine crisis began in the 1940s, when DDT, a modern synthetic insecticide was used liberally to combat malaria, typhus, and other insect-borne diseases.  Almost 10 years later the population of Peregrines started to decline into a critical momentum – DDT was the main culprit. Falconers worked tirelessly with biologists to ban DDT and to reintroduce ‘the world’s fastest animal’ back into the wilds of North America. Today this successful story can be seen on almost every bluff hugging the Tanana River. A few other conservation stories include the release and monitoring the Aplomado Falcon, the California Condor, the Harpy Eagle, the Madagascar Fish Eagle, the Mauritius Kestrel, the Orange-Breasted falcon, and the Prairie Falcon. Today, if you wish to witness this ancient art, lifestyle, and conservation effort for yourself –  head over to the Creamers Field Migratory Waterfowl Refuge …

Creamer’s Field Migratory Waterfowl Refuge: A Wonderful Place to Enjoy the Outdoors and Become One with Nature

The Refuge is owned by the State of Alaska, and managed by the Alaska Department of Fish & Game (ADFG), which covers over 2,000 acres of forest, wetlands and fields, and is home to resident birds including raptors, ravens, grouse, chickadees and redpolls, plus numerous mammals, both small and large.  Wood frogs can also be found, an amphibian that can survive the brutally cold winters thanks to an internal “glycol system” that allows their bodies to freeze solid and return to life each spring.   At the end of the Garden season of 2019, a “Plant America” grant from the In the early 1900s, Creamer’s Dairy was the largest dairy operation in the Interior of Alaska, and remained in operation until the mid 1960s.  The herd size of over 100 milk cows produced milk, cheese, ice cream, etc., and the dairy was one of the most successful operations in the area.  Some of the buildings on the property were constructed in the 1930s, and …

Volunteers from the Fairbanks Garden Club breathe new life into Anna Creamer’s Historical Garden

Susie Crevensten and Liz Masi took on the challenge of restoring and planting the garden in 2019.   At the end of the Garden season of 2019, a “Plant America” grant from the National Garden Club came to our attention and Doug and Susie Crevensten applied for it.  The “Plant America” grant was focused on improving gardens in the community and the Anna Creamer’s Historic Garden certainly fit that description. The grant also supplied a composter which will always be available for soil enrichment. In 2020, gardeners from the Fairbanks Garden Club became interested in making the Historical Garden a real success.  Liz Masi, Carol Slator, Althea St. Martin, Beverly Wright, Marlene Wright, Janet Brower, Susie and Doug Crevensten, Lucy Smyth and Ruth Knapman teamed up for a planting, weeding and watering schedule. “Team Creamer’s” also weeds and takes care of the flowers around the Farmhouse Visitor Center.  The garden is 2/3 vegetables and 1/3 “pollinator” garden.  We plant Buckwheat in one third of the …